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Creative Writing

The Creative Writing program at Roger Williams University leads to a Bachelor of Fine Arts. By dedicating your collegiate study to creative writing, you commit to becoming a writer, and at RWU you can expect to be treated as a serious writer. As such, you will engage in the formal and rigorous study of craft through reading, revising and developing the methodical and critical skills that assist in improving your own creative work as well as the work of others. If you apply yourself to the study of writing in your time at RWU, you can expect to establish solid foundations for the essential practices common to all writers and artists.

Each year, the creative writing program brings to campus such writers as Rick Moody, Kim Addonizio, Marjorie Agosin, Steve Almond, Ann Waldman, Tom Chandler, Stuart Dischell, Mark Halliday, Stewart O’Nan, Dan Chaon, Tobias Wolff, Jennifer Haigh and C.D. Wright who speak on literature and writing and read from their works.

Creative Writing students produce Mount Hope, the national art and literary magazine featuring work by Steve Almond, Ann Hood, Stuart Dischell, Cecilia Woloch and RWU students.

Incoming freshmen are accepted to the creative writing program on the basis of a portfolio, containing both creative and analytical writing, submitted as part of the application process. Matriculating students may enter the creative writing program by earning a grade of B- or higher in CW 210 and CW 220, on the basis of a portfolio, or by recommendation of one or more full-time creative writing faculty members.

Student Learning Outcomes

Description of the undergraduate student learning outcomes (clear statement of expected learning outcomes in the areas of knowledge, skills, competencies)

Foundation Courses

The required CW 210 Form in Poetry, CW 220 Narrative in Writing the Short Story, and four courses from the English major. After completing this group of courses, Creative Writing majors should be able to:

  • Identify literary terms and develop a literary vocabulary
  • Use the library and Internet to locate research materials relevant to course work
  • Analyze literary texts and identify poetic forms and the elements of narrative structure
  • Draft and present formal critical essays emphasizing some aspect of a particular literary work
  • Draft and present imaginative work in the form of fiction and poetry that indicates a student’s experimentation with the specific elements that serve as the foundation of each genre
  • Draft and present formal writing that indicates thoughtfulness and recognition of decisions made during the revision process
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the breadth of literature written in the English and non‐English tradition

Advanced Bridge Courses

The required Advanced Bridge Courses include CW 350 Writers Reading Poetry Seminar, CW 360 Writers Reading Fiction Seminar, CW 440 Writing Contemporary Poetry, and CW 450 The Use of Style in Writing Fiction. After completing this group of courses, Creative Writing majors should be able to:

  • Conduct sophisticated analyses of fictional and poetical texts from a practitioner’s perspective
  • Create sophisticated fictional and poetic texts that reveal a command of literary craft
  • Understand and comment upon the relationship between an author’s life and his or her work

Advanced Breadth Course

Creative Writing majors complete two of the following Advance Breath Courses: CW 310 Creative Nonfiction, CW 330 Literary Publishing, CW 340 Introduction to Playwriting, CW 430 Special Topics in Creative Writing. After completing this group of courses, Creative Writing majors should be able to:

  • Conduct sophisticated analyses of literary works outside the genres of fiction and poetry
  • Create literary works in genres other than fiction and poetry

Breadth Courses in the Fine Arts

To satisfy this requirement, Creative Writing majors must complete one from a list of courses in Dance, Music, the Visual Arts, Graphic Design, or Theatre. After completing this course, Creative Writing majors should be able to:

  • Implement the creative process in an art form other than writing
  • Understand the relationships among the various art forms

Thesis Courses

To satisfy the thesis requirement, Creative Writing majors complete CW 480 Creative Writing Senior Seminar I and CW 481 Seminar II—Thesis. After completing these two courses, Creative Writing majors should be able to:

  • Revise their own creative work
  • Complete an annotated bibliography
  • Compose a thesis including both creative and critical work
  • Present critical work in an interview with creative writing faculty
  • Present creative work in a public reading
Taylor Polites
Adjunct Professor
Contact Information
(401) 254-3035

Taylor Polites

Taylor
Polites
Adjunct Professor
Contact Information
(401) 254-3035

Taylor M. Polites received his MFA in Creative Writing from Wilkes University.  His first novel, The Rebel Wife, was published by Simon & Schuster in February 2012.  His work has appeared in the New York Times “Disunion” blog, artscope magazine, Provincetown Arts Magazine, and other news and arts publications.

Renee Soto, M.F.A.
Associate Professor of Creative Writing
B.A. Mary Washington College, M.F.A. University of North Carolina-Greensboro
Contact Information
x5350
GHH 311

Renee Soto

Renee
Soto
M.F.A.
Associate Professor of Creative Writing
B.A. Mary Washington College, M.F.A. University of North Carolina-Greensboro
Contact Information
x5350
GHH 311

Renee Soto has 15 years in the field of literary publishing, including serving as the Poetry Editor at The Greensboro Review, the Managing Editor at Southern Poetry Review, the Founding Editor/Editor of the RWU national literary journal roger, an art & literary magazine (2004-2011), and she is presently a Contributing Editor at Cave Wall. She was awarded an AWP Intro Journals Award for her poetry and also received the Academy of American Poets University Prize. Her poems and reviews have appeared in such journals as Crab Orchard Review, PostRoad, storySouth, The Cimarron Review, The Greensboro Review, and The Indiana Review.

Edward J. Delaney, M.S.
Professor of Creative Writing
B.S. Fairfield University, M.S. Boston University
Contact Information
x3437
GHH 318

Edward J. Delaney

Edward J.
Delaney
M.S.
Professor of Creative Writing
B.S. Fairfield University, M.S. Boston University
Contact Information
x3437
GHH 318

Edward J. Delaney spent a decade as a journalist at newspapers such as The Denver Post and Chicago Tribune before coming to RWU. He’s published short stories regularly in The Atlantic and other magazines such as Alaska Quarterly Review, Carolina Quarterly, Greensboro Review, Ontario Review, and Cimarron Review, and has. Delaney has published four books: the short-story collection The Drowning, the award-winning novels Warp & Weft and Broken Irish, and the nonfiction book Born to Play, co-authored with Dustin Pedroia of the Boston Red Sox. He has been awarded the PEN-L. L. Winship award for the best book of fiction of the year by a New England author, a Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, and an O. Henry Prize for the short story. His short fiction has appeared in Best American Short Stories. Delaney serves as the editor of the RWU literary magazine, Mount Hope.

www.edwardjdelaney.com

Adam Braver, M.F.A.
Associate Professor of Creative Writing; Writer-in-Residence, University Library
B.A. Vermont College at Norwich University, MFA Goddard College
Contact Information
x3720
GHH 319

Adam Braver

Adam
Braver
M.F.A.
Associate Professor of Creative Writing; Writer-in-Residence, University Library
B.A. Vermont College at Norwich University, MFA Goddard College
Contact Information
x3720
GHH 319

Adam Braver holds the title of RWU Writer-in-Residence. He is the author of five novels (Mr. Lincoln’s Wars, Divine Sarah, Crows Over the Wheatfield, November 22 1963, and Misfit). He also co-edited the nonfiction book, The Madrid Conversations (with former RWU student Molly Gessford), a full-length interview with formerly imprisoned Cuban journalist Normando Hernández Gonzalez. His books have been selected for the Barnes and Noble Discover New Writers program, Borders' Original Voices series, the IndieNext list, and twice for the Book Sense list, as well as having been translated into Italian, Japanese, Turkish, and French. Braver's fiction and essays have appeared in journals such as Daedalus, Ontario Review, Cimarron Review, Water-Stone Review, Harvard Review, Tin House, The Normal School, West Branch, The Pinch, and Post Road.  www.adambraver.com