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Department of English & Creative Writing

Rebecca Karni
Assistant Professor
Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)
Contact Information
(401) 254-3140
GHH 316

Rebecca Karni

Rebecca
Karni
Assistant Professor
Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)
Contact Information
(401) 254-3140
GHH 316

Rebecca Karni completed her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), after which, having obtained a postdoctoral research fellowship, she was a Visiting Postdoctoral Scholar at Stanford University’s Departments of English and Comparative Literature. Her academic interests include 20th- and 21st-century global/world, British, American, Anglophone, Asian British and Asian American, Japanese, and French/Francophone literatures; literary studies in the contexts of globalization, transnationalism, and cosmopolitanism; the ethics of reading and representation; translation and mediation; affect and literary studies; diaspora studies; transnational (especially East-West) aesthetics, translation, and interpretation; the novel and narrative; film and visual culture; literary and critical theory; ecocriticism; and literature and/as performance.

Roberta E. Adams, Ph.D.
Associate Dean of Humanities and Performing Arts, Professor of English
A.B., English, University of Michigan M.A., TESL, University of Massachusetts Boston M.A. and Ph.D., English, Indiana University Bloomington
Contact Information
(401) 254-3828
GHH 308

Roberta E. Adams

Roberta E.
Adams
Ph.D.
Associate Dean of Humanities and Performing Arts, Professor of English
A.B., English, University of Michigan M.A., TESL, University of Massachusetts Boston M.A. and Ph.D., English, Indiana University Bloomington
Contact Information
(401) 254-3828
GHH 308

Teaching interests: survey courses in British and world literatures, medieval British and East Asian literatures. As Associate Dean, I teach one course per semester; these have included CORE 104, ENG 100, ENG 270 and special topics courses in Medieval Literature, Classics of World Literature, and World Short Story. As a member of the East Asian Studies program faculty, I also teach ASIA 100, Foundations of East Asian Studies.

Jeffrey Rinehart
Adjunct Professor
Contact Information

Jeffrey Rinehart

Jeffrey
Rinehart
Adjunct Professor
Contact Information
Taylor Polites
Adjunct Professor
Contact Information
(401) 254-3035

Taylor Polites

Taylor
Polites
Adjunct Professor
Contact Information
(401) 254-3035

Taylor M. Polites received his MFA in Creative Writing from Wilkes University.  His first novel, The Rebel Wife, was published by Simon & Schuster in February 2012.  His work has appeared in the New York Times “Disunion” blog, artscope magazine, Provincetown Arts Magazine, and other news and arts publications.

James Tackach, Ph.D.
Professor of English
B.A. Montclair State College, M.A., Ph.D. University of Rhode Island
Contact Information
x3234
GHH 314

James Tackach

James
Tackach
Ph.D.
Professor of English
B.A. Montclair State College, M.A., Ph.D. University of Rhode Island
Contact Information
x3234
GHH 314

Like Bruce Springsteen, Professor James Tackach was born in the U.S.A. (Passaic, N.J., to be specific).  He also has a passion for American literature.  His M.A. thesis focused on the American WWI novel.  His Ph.D. dissertation focused on Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.  For the past several years, he has been especially interested in the Puritans and the American antebellum era.  He began teaching at RWU in 1979.  

He currently teaches both American literature survey courses (ENG 240 and ENG 260) and a variety of special topics courses, including courses on Ernest Hemingway, the Southern Literary Renaissance, the African American novel, the literature of the Civil War, and the literature of the 1950 and 1960s.  The survey courses, which span Plymouth Rock to World War II, cover many of the major American literary figures: Anne Bradstreet, Ben Franklin, Henry David Thoreau, Fredrick Douglass, Emily Dickinson, Stephen Crane, Richard Wright, Hemingway, and William Faulkner’sThe Sound and the Fury.

Renee Soto, M.F.A.
Associate Professor of Creative Writing
B.A. Mary Washington College, M.F.A. University of North Carolina-Greensboro
Contact Information
x5350
GHH 311

Renee Soto

Renee
Soto
M.F.A.
Associate Professor of Creative Writing
B.A. Mary Washington College, M.F.A. University of North Carolina-Greensboro
Contact Information
x5350
GHH 311

Renee Soto has 15 years in the field of literary publishing, including serving as the Poetry Editor at The Greensboro Review, the Managing Editor at Southern Poetry Review, the Founding Editor/Editor of the RWU national literary journal roger, an art & literary magazine (2004-2011), and she is presently a Contributing Editor at Cave Wall. She was awarded an AWP Intro Journals Award for her poetry and also received the Academy of American Poets University Prize. Her poems and reviews have appeared in such journals as Crab Orchard Review, PostRoad, storySouth, The Cimarron Review, The Greensboro Review, and The Indiana Review.

Deborah A. Robinson, Ph.D.
Professor of English
B.A. Roger Williams University, M.A. Clark University, Ph.D. University of Rhode Island
Contact Information
x3435
GHH 315

Deborah A. Robinson

Deborah A.
Robinson
Ph.D.
Professor of English
B.A. Roger Williams University, M.A. Clark University, Ph.D. University of Rhode Island
Contact Information
x3435
GHH 315

Deborah RobinsonLooking at the courses I teach, some might say my literary interests are either eclectic or unfocused. In fact, the thematic thread that links these classes and fuels my passion is not located in a single period or genre, but rather in the mythological and symbolic processes inherent in all literature. What draws me to literature is its documentation of the vibrant creativity of the human imagination, especially our ability to construct abstract ideas and stories from the "stuff" of the concrete world around us in an attempt to order it, to explain and justify our existence. Homer's Iliad, Tolkien's Hobbit, a Native American creation myth, or Christine de Pizan's Book of the City of Ladies each stands as a cultural artifact, echoing at once the cosmology and ethos of the distinct culture that created it but also documenting the humanity that links us all across time and cultures.

Edward J. Delaney, M.S.
Professor of Creative Writing
B.S. Fairfield University, M.S. Boston University
Contact Information
x3437
GHH 318

Edward J. Delaney

Edward J.
Delaney
M.S.
Professor of Creative Writing
B.S. Fairfield University, M.S. Boston University
Contact Information
x3437
GHH 318

Edward J. Delaney spent a decade as a journalist at newspapers such as The Denver Post and Chicago Tribune before coming to RWU. He’s published short stories regularly in The Atlantic and other magazines such as Alaska Quarterly Review, Carolina Quarterly, Greensboro Review, Ontario Review, and Cimarron Review, and has. Delaney has published four books: the short-story collection The Drowning, the award-winning novels Warp & Weft and Broken Irish, and the nonfiction book Born to Play, co-authored with Dustin Pedroia of the Boston Red Sox. He has been awarded the PEN-L. L. Winship award for the best book of fiction of the year by a New England author, a Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, and an O. Henry Prize for the short story. His short fiction has appeared in Best American Short Stories. Delaney serves as the editor of the RWU literary magazine, Mount Hope.

www.edwardjdelaney.com

Margaret Case, Ph.D
Chair, Department of English Literature and Creative Writing
B.A., M.A., Ph.D. University of Virginia
Contact Information
x3232
GHH 312
Areas of Expertise: 
18th-century British literature, Rise of the Novel, Literary Theory/Cultural Criticism, Jane Austen

Margaret Case

Margaret
Case
Ph.D
Chair, Department of English Literature and Creative Writing
B.A., M.A., Ph.D. University of Virginia
Contact Information
x3232
GHH 312
Areas of Expertise: 
18th-century British literature, Rise of the Novel, Literary Theory/Cultural Criticism, Jane Austen

Dr. Case's areas of specialization are the 18th-century novel and literary theory. Her dissertation focussed on the narrative innovations of Eliza Haywood, a prolific novelist in her own day (famously lampooned by Henry Fielding as "Mrs. Novel"). A century later, however, Haywood’s name had almost completely disappeared from literary history. The reasons she has been both "lost" and "found" reveal a great deal about the genealogy of literary and popular culture. Dr. Case's recent scholarship focuses on popular representations of traditional social conflicts (e.g. the relationship between social Darwinism and religious conflict in Battlestar Galactica, and "family values" in Breaking Bad.)

Adam Braver, M.F.A.
Associate Professor of Creative Writing; Writer-in-Residence, University Library
B.A. Vermont College at Norwich University, MFA Goddard College
Contact Information
x3720
GHH 319

Adam Braver

Adam
Braver
M.F.A.
Associate Professor of Creative Writing; Writer-in-Residence, University Library
B.A. Vermont College at Norwich University, MFA Goddard College
Contact Information
x3720
GHH 319

Adam Braver holds the title of RWU Writer-in-Residence. He is the author of five novels (Mr. Lincoln’s Wars, Divine Sarah, Crows Over the Wheatfield, November 22 1963, and Misfit). He also co-edited the nonfiction book, The Madrid Conversations (with former RWU student Molly Gessford), a full-length interview with formerly imprisoned Cuban journalist Normando Hernández Gonzalez. His books have been selected for the Barnes and Noble Discover New Writers program, Borders' Original Voices series, the IndieNext list, and twice for the Book Sense list, as well as having been translated into Italian, Japanese, Turkish, and French. Braver's fiction and essays have appeared in journals such as Daedalus, Ontario Review, Cimarron Review, Water-Stone Review, Harvard Review, Tin House, The Normal School, West Branch, The Pinch, and Post Road.  www.adambraver.com