Skip to Content

School of Architecture, Art, & Historic Preservation

A Dream in Full Bloom

April 7, 2014

NEW YORK, N.Y. – It was a chance discovery that led Vivien Sin ’06 to pursue a degree in architecture. An artist since childhood, she had her sights set on visual arts until School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation Dean Stephen White discovered Sin’s natural talent as she sat in a corner of his classroom, hoping not to be noticed.

Sin, who had only recently moved to the U.S. and spoke little English, admits she didn’t understand the assignment and was terrified to be called on. It was then that White noticed her sketches.

“I was doing diagramming without knowing it,” Sin says. “Steve saw it and told me I was already at a second-year level and needed to go to architecture school. It changed my life. I was just a kid trying to figure out what I wanted to do, and he took me in. If not for him, I wouldn’t be an architect right now.”

SASH: Community Engagement Celebration

The Student Academic Symposium and Honors (SASH) provides a forum for students to present their scholarly and creative work before an audience of peers. There are standing displays all week, as well as morning sessions consisting of students’ poster presentations; and afternoon and evening sessions consisting of concurrent sessions that include students’ thesis, capstone and other paper or project presentations, panel discussions, displays of design work, exhibitions of visual and multimedia artifacts, performing arts recitals, literary readings, theatrical performances, and spotlighting of Community Partnership Center projects.

The keynote speaker, Paul Loeb, will present a lecture on April 22 at 3:00 p.m. in the GHH Atrium.

Student Academic Showcase and Honors

The Student Academic Symposium and Honors (SASH) provides a forum for students to present their scholarly and creative work before an audience of peers. There are standing displays all week, as well as morning sessions consisting of students’ poster presentations; and afternoon and evening sessions consisting of concurrent sessions that include students’ thesis, capstone and other paper or project presentations, panel discussions, displays of design work, exhibitions of visual and multimedia artifacts, performing arts recitals, literary readings, theatrical performances, and spotlighting of Community Partnership Center projects.

The keynote speaker, Paul Loeb, will present a lecture on April 22 at 3:00 p.m. in the GHH Atrium.

Click here to read the full program schedule. The Honors Program, the Office of the Provost, and Alpha Chi, in consultation with the SASH Steering Committee, are the primary sponsors of the week-long event. Open to the public.

Student Academic Showcase and Honors

The Student Academic Symposium and Honors (SASH) provides a forum for students to present their scholarly and creative work before an audience of peers. There are standing displays all week, as well as morning sessions consisting of students’ poster presentations; and afternoon and evening sessions consisting of concurrent sessions that include students’ thesis, capstone and other paper or project presentations, panel discussions, displays of design work, exhibitions of visual and multimedia artifacts, performing arts recitals, literary readings, theatrical performances, and spotlighting of Community Partnership Center projects.

The keynote speaker, Paul Loeb, will present a lecture on April 22 at 3:00 p.m. in the GHH Atrium.

Click here to read the full program schedule. The Honors Program, the Office of the Provost, and Alpha Chi, in consultation with the SASH Steering Committee, are the primary sponsors of the week-long event. Open to the public.

Student Academic Showcase and Honors

The Student Academic Symposium and Honors (SASH) provides a forum for students to present their scholarly and creative work before an audience of peers. There are standing displays all week, as well as morning sessions consisting of students’ poster presentations; and afternoon and evening sessions consisting of concurrent sessions that include students’ thesis, capstone and other paper or project presentations, panel discussions, displays of design work, exhibitions of visual and multimedia artifacts, performing arts recitals, literary readings, theatrical performances, and spotlighting of Community Partnership Center projects.

The keynote speaker, Paul Loeb, will present a lecture on April 22 at 3:00 p.m. in the GHH Atrium.

Click here to read the full program schedule. The Honors Program, the Office of the Provost, and Alpha Chi, in consultation with the SASH Steering Committee, are the primary sponsors of the week-long event. Open to the public.

Student Academic Showcase and Honors

The Student Academic Symposium and Honors (SASH) provides a forum for students to present their scholarly and creative work before an audience of peers. There are standing displays all week, as well as morning sessions consisting of students’ poster presentations; and afternoon and evening sessions consisting of concurrent sessions that include students’ thesis, capstone and other paper or project presentations, panel discussions, displays of design work, exhibitions of visual and multimedia artifacts, performing arts recitals, literary readings, theatrical performances, and spotlighting of Community Partnership Center projects.

The keynote speaker, Paul Loeb, will present a lecture on April 22 at 3:00 p.m. in the GHH Atrium.

Click here to read the full program schedule. The Honors Program, the Office of the Provost, and Alpha Chi, in consultation with the SASH Steering Committee, are the primary sponsors of the week-long event. Open to the public.

Celebrate the Arts in April at RWU

March 26, 2014

BRISTOL, R.I. – With a robust schedule of presenters set to share their talents with the University community in the coming weeks, RWU is poised to embark on a campus-wide celebration of the Arts in April.

From artists and authors to poets and performers, a cadre of talent from both the local and national communities will appear in a variety of venues on the Bristol campus – including two President’s Distinguished Speakers Series presentations and a must-see jazz concert in association with the Newport Jazz Festival.

All events are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted. A campus map can be found here. Check back for updates.

Film & Visual Arts

Creating a Campus-Wide Social Justice Movement

March 11, 2014

Editor's note: This story is part of the 10 on Tuesday series, which provides a fresh take on interesting university initiatives, research projects, campus happenings and more.

BRISTOL, R.I. – What started with a weeklong series of events and activities inspiring social awareness and activism at last fall’s Social Justice Week is now reaching across campus to include more than 30 student groups, academic and administrative departments to work together on a movement creating social change and equity for all members of Roger Williams University. From courses such as Writing for Social Change to events like Leadership Unity Day, individual campus groups have already been encouraging more diversity, tolerance and cultural sensitivity – but this semester, an initiative was launched to establish a campus-wide culture of social activism and inclusion.

SAAHP Symposium – Directions in 21st Century Preservation

Presented by RWU SAAHP and Historic New England and supported by the Historic Preservation Endowed Events Fund. Registration is required at www.HistoricNewEngland.org/events-programs

Inset: Graham House by Eliot Noyes, Stamford, Connecticut, 1969. A private property protected by a Historic New England preservation; easement courtesy of Historic New England.

Acclaimed Journalist and Filmmaker David Wilson to Explore Race in America

March 4, 2014

BRISTOL, R.I. – In April 2008, journalist and filmmaker David Wilson reignited a national dialog on today’s race issues by releasing a groundbreaking documentary film, “Meeting David Wilson.” The film followed his journey to North Carolina where he not only discovered the plantation where his relatives were enslaved, but also a descendent of the slave master: a 62-year-old white man also named David Wilson.

On Tuesday, April 1, members of the public are invited to spend an evening with Wilson, learn more about his transformative journey and discuss America’s racial divide as part of the President’s Distinguished Speakers Series.

Thumbnail (RWU Main):