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School of Architecture, Art, & Historic Preservation

President’s Distinguished Speakers Series: Jane Elliott

In 1968, as a third-grade schoolteacher in small-town Iowa, Jane Elliott devised the controversial “Blue Eyes/Brown Eyes” exercise in response to the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. Forty-seven years later, it remains one of the most powerful illustrations of the injurious effects of prejudice and discrimination.

With clips from “Eye of the Storm” – an ABC News documentary on her exercise – the esteemed teacher, presenter and diversity trainer will explore power, perception and prejudice in modern-day America, sharing ideas on topics from microagressions to privilege to stereotypes and more in a presentation titled "Blue-Eyed, Brown-Eyed."

The event is also part of a yearlong series at RWU titled 150 Years Later: The 13th Amendment & Race in America, which calls upon us to both celebrate the monumental legislation to abolish slavery, but also to reflect critically on the current state of race relations in the U.S.

President’s Distinguished Speakers Series: Panel Discussion Featuring Leonard Pitts Jr.

In his second visit to RWU, Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Leonard Pitts Jr. will join a panel of experts and commentators from the University and beyond in discussing the 1865 amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which abolished slavery in America, and its impact over the 150 years since its passage in a presentation titled: "The Modern Legacy of the 13th Amendment and Race Relations in the U.S." 

Other panelists include:

In an Inequitable Election Process, How to Regain the 'Equal Vote'

February 27, 2015

BRISTOL, R.I. – When it comes to achieving top political office in America, enough money can supplant the intention of “a government for the people, by the people.”

That's according to acclaimed author, attorney and activist Lawrence Lessig, who addressed a standing-room-only audience on Monday, Feb. 23, as part of the President’s Distinguished Speakers Series. With less than one percent of the population providing nearly three-quarters of all federal campaign funding via Super PACs, he said, equality in political representation is far from reality in America.

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How to Talk About Race Without Starting a Riot: David Wilson Returns to RWU

February 9, 2015

BRISTOL, R.I. – Drawing on history, current events and his own experience as a young black man growing up in Newark, N.J., journalist and filmmaker David A. Wilson has emerged as a leading voice in encouraging an open dialogue and national conversation on race relations in America.

On Tuesday, Feb. 17, Wilson will make his second visit to Roger Williams University as part of the President’s Distinguished Speakers Series for an event titled “How to Talk About Race Without Starting a Riot.” Wilson’s groundbreaking documentary, “Meeting David Wilson,” will be screened in its entirety, and a question and answer session will follow.

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President's Distinguished Speakers Series: David A. Wilson

Drawing on history, current events and his own personal experience, journalist and documentary filmmaker David A. Wilson has emerged as a leading voice in encouraging an open dialogue and national conversation on race relations in America.

In Wilson’s second visit to Roger Williams University, his groundbreaking film – “Meeting David Wilson” – will be screened in its entirety, and a Q&A session with the acclaimed filmmaker will follow.

The event is part of a yearlong series at RWU titled 150 Years Later: The 13th Amendment & Race in America, which calls upon us to both celebrate the monumental legislation to abolish slavery, but also to reflect critically on the current state of race relations in the U.S.

This event is free and open to the public; no tickets are required. For more information, call 401-254-3166.

President's Distinguished Speakers Series: Lawrence Lessig

In a conversation titled "Equal Citizens," preeminent scholar, attorney and activist Lawrence Lessig will explore the issue of political funding and its effect on equality in America.  

Lawrence Lessig is the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership at Harvard Law School, and director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University. He is an expert on intellectual property and Internet policy, and a watchdog on government corruption. He’s also an acclaimed free thinker and visionary, and one of the more captivating voices in America today.

In this presentation, Professor Lessig will discuss how political campaign funding has fundamentally distorted the commitment to equality instilled by our framers more than two centuries ago.

A book signing will immediately follow the event.

This event is free and open to the public; no tickets are required. For more information, call 401-254-3166.

RWU students will receive a 1/3 merit lottery point for attending this event.

Photo credit: Yanai Yechiel

CPC Plan to Transform Abandoned Pawtucket / Central Falls Mill Earns APA-RI Award

December 11, 2014

BRISTOL, R.I. – The Rhode Island chapter of the American Planning Association (APA) will award a group of 30 Roger Williams University students (some now recent alumni) and three faculty members for their success in creating a comprehensive redevelopment plan for an abandoned manufacturing property, the former site of The Conant Thread Company and Coats & Clark Mill Complex located on the border of Pawtucket and Central Falls. Through the Community Partnerships Center, business, architecture and historic preservation students worked together with Commerce RI, the Pawtucket Foundation and the two cities to produce a plan aimed at preserving and revitalizing the mill site, an area that has been vacant since 1964.

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Student Research Digs Up Dirt on Newport’s Pre-Revolution Historic Properties

December 9, 2014

BRISTOL, R.I. – Murder, bankruptcies, 18th century interracial marriages – not the standard fare a group of RWU historic preservation students expected to uncover in their recent field research of Colonial Era buildings in Newport. Yet they were as enthused as they were stunned to discover such tales.

“These kinds of finds opened eyes in many ways to the lives of these buildings,” says School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation adjunct professor Catherine Zipf. “These are Colonial buildings – they predate the Revolution. We observe and think about how they are today, and how they began, but we don’t think about the almost 200 years in between.”

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Turkey Basket Judging

Judging for the Feinstein Center's annual Turkey Basket competition begins promptly at 4 p.m. and snacks will be provided to spread the holiday spirit. The contest helps those less fortunate in our community by providing Bristol/Warren families with complete holiday meals. All baskets will be donated to the East Bay Food Pantry, which has over 2,000 clients and is constantly growing. Prizes will awarded to the baskets based on: Quality, Quantity, & Creativity. All winners will receive a $75 restaurant gift card.

Slideshow: Future Architects Put Market Theory into Practice

November 12, 2014

BRISTOL, R.I. – An elevated walkway with sweeping river views, a rooftop grapevine trellis whose arbor shades outdoor areas, and an open wood-frame structure evocative of barns are just some of the creative design elements conceived by architecture students last spring for a potential food hub and events space in Providence.

In a graduate-level urban design studio that doubled as a real client project via the Community Partnerships Center, a dozen future architects helped the Providence Food Market Steering Committee determine a vision for an indoor-outdoor market reminiscent of a Parisian street scene. Led by Anthony Piermarini – a principal at Studio Luz Architecture – the students evaluated properties around Providence and dreamt up grand (and innovatively small-scale) designs based on the committee’s desire for a market space for local farmers and fishermen to sell their catch, where chefs can offer cooking demonstrations, and provide a destination for neighbors to meet up and listen to live music.