Skip to Content

Faculty & Staff

National Exhibition on Lincoln's Legacy Kicks Off at RWU Next Week

September 16, 2014

BRISTOL, R.I. – With a country divided over the issue of slavery and torn apart by civil war in the 1860s, Abraham Lincoln faced an extraordinary test as President of the United States. A national traveling exhibition coming to Roger Williams University will examine the difficult decisions that confronted President Lincoln – whether to adhere to executive constraints within the Constitution or flex his powers as Commander-in-Chief to ensure that America continued to live up to the ideals of liberty and equality for all.

Thumbnail (RWU Main): 

Great Films Series: "Glory"

"Glory" (1989) is the heart-stopping story of the first black regiment to fight for the North in the Civil War. Denzel Washington stars in this Oscar-winning performance as the runaway slave who embodies the indomitable spirit of the 54th Regiment of Massachusetts, along with Matthew Broderick, Cary Elwes and Morgan Freeman. Directed by Edward Zwick. Jennifer Stevens, a professor in the Department of History and American Studies, will provide a brief introduction. Sponsored by the Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences.

Socrates Café: “Are We Living Up to the Proposition That All Men Are Created Equal?”

Socrates Café is a forum for a guided discussion of a philosophically significant question. In keeping with the theme of the traveling exhibit, "Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War," on display in the library from September 23 to October 31, a moderated discussion will challenge students and faculty to explore whether the United States is truly “dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.” Moderated by Professor David Logan from the RWU School of Law.
 

Evening Amusements: What Lincoln Was Listening To

A program of poignant songs, thrilling readings, uproarious stories, and diverting parlor games such as might have entertained a mid-19th-century gathering. Directed by Professor Catherine Hawkes, a professor in the Department of Music.

This event is part of a series of Roger Williams University sponsored programs – from faculty lectures to performing arts productions to a student project showcase – held in conjunction with the traveling exhibition: “Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War” on display in the University Library from September 23 to October 31. The exhibition is sponsored by the American Library Association in conjunction with the National Endowment for the Humanities and based on the original exhibition developed by the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia. Check PDQ calendar for a schedule of events. For more information, please visit http://library.rwu.edu/lib/events/lincoln-traveling-exhibit/.

Proposition (Truth Value): Equality

A performance art installation created by the RWU Dance and Performance Studies students enrolled in Advanced Choreography. Mentored by Cathy Nicoli, assistant professor of Dance and Performance Studies.

This event is part of a series of Roger Williams University sponsored programs – from faculty lectures to performing arts productions to a student project showcase – held in conjunction with the traveling exhibition: “Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War” on display in the University Library from September 23 to October 31. The exhibition is sponsored by the American Library Association in conjunction with the National Endowment for the Humanities and based on the original exhibition developed by the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia. Check PDQ calendar for a schedule of events. For more information, pleae visit http://library.rwu.edu/lib/events/lincoln-traveling-exhibit/.

Death, Memory and the Civil War

Associate Professor of Visual Arts Anne Tait will address the memorials that lead up to and became the standard of recognition of the dead in this growing country. As the Civil War closed, enduring memorials needed to be made for the estimated 620,000 who had died. It was General Ulysses Grant who determined that no foreign stone would lie on the graves of his soldiers. This decision ensured that memorials were made only from stone extracted from U.S. quarries, resulting in the growth of the American quarry industry. 

Lincoln as a Wartime President

In time of war, presidential power is at its peak. How did Lincoln use, and possibly abuse, this power? How do his actions compare with other war-time presidents like FDR, LBJ, and Barack Obama? June Speakman, a professor in the Department of Politics and International Relations, will engage the audience in finding answers to these questions regarding presidential authority.

This is part of a series of Roger Williams University sponsored programs – from faculty lectures to performing arts productions to a student project showcase – held in conjunction with the traveling exhibition: “Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War” on display in the University Library from September 23 to October 31. The exhibition is sponsored by the American Library Association in conjunction with the National Endowment for the Humanities and based on the original exhibition developed by the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia. Check PDQ calendar for a schedule of events. For more information see the RWU Library Exhibition website: http://library.rwu.edu/lib/events/lincoln-traveling-exhibit

The Thirteenth Amendment: The Rhode Island Connection

John Parrillo, an adjunct professor in the Department of History and American Studies, will discuss official Congressional documents of the 1780s that disclose the heroic efforts of Rhode Island’s David Howell and William Ellery as champions of abolitionism. Debra Mulligan, an associate professor in the Department of History and American Studies, will consider the motive for Rhode Island’s passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, which on the one hand solidified the state’s social order, but on the other, set in motion the seeds for future discontent between the African-Americans and the Irish Catholic immigrants.
 

Coming Out Day

OUTFest in the GHH Atrium from 3 to 5:00 p.m. Open to all students. Come enjoy games, food, and giveaways, as well as learn about National Coming Out Day. Co-sponsored by SAFE.

Mackenzie Pawliger Workshop (Trans* 101) in the School of Engineering, Room124, from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Merit point program open to all students. Learn about gender and sexuality pertaining to trans-identity.

Open Mic Event in GHH G01 from 6 to 7 p.m. Open to all students, faculty, and staff. Come share your coming out story (even if it's for the first time!) and show support for LGBTQ-identifying members of the RWU community.

Candlelight Vigil on the lawn behind GHH from 7 to 8 p.m. Open to all students, faculty, and staff. Come honor the voices not heard, and reflect on the events of the day.

Information about Coming Out Day and the day's events will be available at a table in the Commons from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Live@RWU Presents the Johnny O'Neal Trio [Sold Out]

Ticketing Information

Due to high demand for the Live@RWU series and a limited seating capacity in Global Heritage Hall, tickets for the Johnny O’Neal concert are now sold out.

However – in the event that there are no-show ticket holders – we will do our best to accommodate guests if any seats are empty at the concert’s start time.

For those without tickets who are still interested in attending, please show up outside Global Heritage Hall no later than 7:15 pm on Wednesday, Sept. 17. We will accommodate as many additional guests as seating capacity allows.

About Johnny O'Neal

After an early career playing gospel piano in churches near his native Detroit, Johnny O’Neal began a lifelong exploration of jazz in 1976. In the early 1980s, he burst onto New York City’s jazz scene with such touch, unparalleled command of tunes and love of performing that he’s still the hottest ticket today.