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Matthew T. Gregg

Matthew T. Gregg, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Economics

B.A. Roanoke College
Ph.D. University of Georgia

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Areas of Expertise: 
Research: U.S. Economic History. Teaching: Econometrics, Microeconomics, Environmental Economics

Matt Gregg is an associate professor of economics at Roger Williams University. 

My research focusses on the role of historical features on current economic development, with specific application to American Indian economic development.  Since assimilation policies during the late nineteenth century and subsequent decades have profoundly shaped the world American Indians live in today, I focus my research on the long-run effects of Indian boarding school exposure and land privatization on current economic development.

Another strand of my research focuses on using quantitative data and empirical strategies to test long-lasting theories about historical events.  For example, my work with co-author David Wishart tested conjectures by historians on Cherokee Removal, i.e., the “Trail of Tears.”  We used muster rolls, Indian Bureau quarterly expenditure statements, and basic demographic models to re-estimate the death toll and cost burdens of this famous event. 

I am presently working with Melinda Miller on various projects involving digitalizing old allotment maps from the turn-of-the-twentieth century and finding correlations with current light density data on reservations.

I teach Principles of Microeconomics and Macroeconomics, Introductory Econometrics, Environmental Economics and Labor Economics.


"The Price of Cherokee Removal' (with D.M. Wishart).  Explorations in Economic History, 49(4)2012, pp.423-442

"The Political Economy of American Indian Allotment Revised" (with D.M. Cooper).  Journal of Business and Economics Research, (8) 2010, pp. 89-99.

 "Shortchanged: Uncovering the Value of Pre-Removal Cherokee Property." The Chronicles of Oklahoma, (3) 2009, pp. 320-335.

 "Technical Efficiency Estimates of Cherokee Agriculture: A Pre- and Post-Removal Analysis." Journal of Socio-Economics, (3) 2009, pp. 18-29.

 "Cultural Persistence as Behavior Towards Risk: Evidence from the North Carolina Cherokees, 1850-1880." Journal of Income Distribution, (2) 2009, pp. 3-15.

 "Market-Orientation and the Multi-Factor Productivity of Cherokee Indian Farmers before Removal." Essays in Economic and Business History, (23) 2005, pp. 20-38.