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  • Courses in the Spotlight

The department is pleased to offer the following courses:

Spring 2016 Upper-Level Offerings:


WTNG 250: Advanced Composition 

Dr. Jennifer Campbell  MWF 11:00-11:50am

Dr. John Madritch  TTH 11:00am-12:20pm

This course provides writers with advanced practice in drafting, revising, and editing non-fiction prose, with particular emphasis placed on questions of voice and style. Students will experiment with invention strategies and editing techniques as they plan, draft, and revise essays for a variety of purposes and audiences. In addition, they will read and respond to their own and their classmates’ writing in order to propose ideas for revision and editing. 

  • Prerequisite: Successful completion (C- or higher) of WTNG 102
  • Fulfills the second of two University Core Curriculum requirements in the University Writing Program
  • Fulfills a course requirement in the Professional and Public Writing Minor and the Writing Studies/Professional and Public Writing Core Concentration

WTNG 299: Tutoring in the Writing Center

Karen Bilotti  TTH 12:30-1:50pm

Tutoring Writing is a research and experience-based course that familiarizes students with the complex field of writing center studies. The course introduces students to significant challenges and current practices in university writing centers. It also prepares them to tutor writers in an effective, informed, and sympathetic manner.  Students will read and write reflectively on professional journal articles; create tip sheets on grammar, documentation and mechanics; produce their own research-based article that conforms to discourse community standards in the field; and write a proposal as a final project. Students gain practical experience working with writers in face-to-face, online, and simulated tutoring sessions. Enrollment is limited to current and former tutors and/or minors and core concentrators in Professional and Public Writing or with instructor permission.

  • Prerequisite: Successful completion (C- or higher) of WTNG 102
  • Fulfills the second of two University Core Curriculum requirements in the University Writing Program
  • Fulfills a course requirement in the Professional and Public Writing Minor and the Writing Studies/Professional and Public Writing Core Concentration

WTNG 303: Environmental Rhetoric

Dr. Paul E. Bender  TTH 12:30-1:50pm

Welcome to the Anthropocene. If this is the age in which humans become a world-wide environmental force, perhaps its time to examine the premises on which our relationship to the natural world rest. This course will examine important writers and thinkers from Henry David Thoreau to William McKibben for ways in which arguments about the human/nature relationship have evolved. The tensions in this relationship, this course argues, have forged environmentalism into a counter-hegemonic discourse that challenges fundamental assumptions about the centrality of man, the role and value of “progress,” and the utility of nature.  Students will read, research, analyze, and produce environmental arguments with particular emphasis on arguments emerging from and engaging with the public sphere.

  • Prerequisite: Successful completion (C- or higher) of WTNG 102                                                                
  • Fulfills the second of two University Core Curriculum requirements in the University Writing Program        
  • Fulfills a course requirement in the Professional and Public Writing Minor and the Writing Studies/Professional and Public Writing Core Concentration                                                                                                          
  • Fulfills an elective in the Sustainability Studies Minor and Core Concentration 

WTNG 311:  Technical Writing

Dr. Mel Topf  TTH 9:30-10:50am & 11:00am-12:20pm

Students will apply fundamental concepts of effective technical writing that will prepare them for writing in industry, government and other professional contexts in which technical documents help achieve major goals.  Focus will be on a major social or political issue.  The technical writer, far from merely transferring technical information, must make judgments about his or her discourse community, purpose, and rhetorical situation.  Students will study key principles of rhetorical theory, the idea of genre, and the concept of a professional audience.  Technical documents studies may include feasibility studies, proposals, progress reports, and policy statement.

  • Prerequisite: Successful completion (C- or higher) of WTNG 102
  • Fulfills the second of two University Core Curriculum requirements in the University Writing Program
  • Fulfills a course requirement in the Professional and Public Writing Minor and the Writing Studies/Professional and Public Writing Core Concentration

WTNG 320:  Writing for Business Organizations

Dr. Mel Topf  MTH 2:00-3:20pm & 3:30-4:40pm

This course explores the causes of the success or failure of writing for business organizations.  The course takes a case-based approach, with a focus on a major issue confronting American business organizations.  Students will study the theory and practice of business writing as a pragmatic effort to accomplish specific goals.  Included are the study of genres of business documents, ethical and social problems, the causes and consequences of writing failures, and the problems addressing the interests of business readers as a discourse community.

  • Prerequisite: Successful completion (C- or higher) of WTNG 102
  • Fulfills the second of two University Core Curriculum requirements in the University Writing Program
  • Fulfills a course requirement in the Professional and Public Writing Minor and in the Writing Studies/Professional and Public Writing Core Concentration

WTNG 400: Writing for Social Change

Dr. Nancy Nester  MWF 10:00-10:50am

WTNG 400: Writing for Social Change is scheduled to run for the third time in Spring 2016 at 10 a.m.. on MWF.  In this class, participants expand and apply the knowledge of Writing they have gained in our Program as well as in their majors.  In addition, the course provides us an opportunity to enact one of the University’s Core Values, our Commitment to Community Service.  In the past, we have worked with a local agency that serves the vocational, educational, and social needs of adults with developmental challenges.  We hope to do the same in the Spring.

Students of all majors can offer their talents to achieve the objectives of the agency and will gain valuable experience in the non-profit sector.

My teaching/learning approach to the course will be experiential, involving student, faculty, and agency collaboration, on-site research, interaction with clients, on-campus discussion of social justice and human rights issues, primary and secondary source research, writing workshops, and text production.     

The genres we write will be determined by the issues the agency wants to address, but typically those texts include proposals, reports, analyses, publicity materials, memos, letters, minutes of meetings, and annotated bibliographies. 

If you have questions, please contact Nancy Nester at X3358 or write nnester@rwu.edu.

  • Prerequisite: Successful completion of a 200 or 300 level WTNG course and at least Junior Standing
  • Fulfills a course requirement in the Professional and Public Writing Minor and the Writing Studies/Professional and Public Writing Core Concentration

 

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